15 marzo 2012

Nuovi depressi

Un'indagine europea condotta su oltre 57mila europei, tra cui settemila italiani, e condotta da Kanthar Health, traccia l'identikit della depressione oggi. L'incidenza di questa malattia non è in aumento, sebbene molto diffusa: circa un italiano su dieci dice di avere sofferto del "male oscuro" nel corso dell'ultimo anno.

Le donne rischiano il doppio dell'uomo di ammalarsi di depressione: «Sono più esposte a fattori stressogeni: per loro mantenere un lavoro e un reddito è più complicato, pure la gestione del tempo è difficile visto che sono molte di più le ore di lavoro domestico e cura familiare - spiega Claudio Mencacci, direttore del Dipartimento di Neuroscienze dell'azienda ospedaliera Fatebenefratelli di Milano - Inoltre le donne sono più spesso vittime di violenze in ambito domestico e non, e questo è uno dei fattori ambientali che più incidono sul rischio di ammalarsi».

Dall'indagine emerge che i depressi sono mediamente giovani, single, oppure divorziati, separati o vedovi. E' evidente la difficoltà sul lavoro e nelle relazioni sociali. I depressi hanno più raramente degli altri un posto a tempo pieno, sono più spesso in cerca di un'occupazione, in un caso su tre denunciano un reddito basso.

Tanto più si è predisposti alla malattia, tanto minore sarà il peso dell'evento stressante sufficiente a far precipitare un episodio di depressione. La malattia facilita stili di vita poco sani ed è frequente la comorbilità con ansia, mal di testa, disturbi del sonno, obesità, colesterolo alto, reflusso gastrico, dolori addominali, colon irritabile, aritmie, artrite, dermatiti.

fonte: eDott

10 marzo 2012

Kisses (Truffaut poetry and Dylan music)

Kisses (2008)
72 min  -  Drama   -  21 November 2008 (Ireland)




Two kids, Dylan and Kylie, run away from home at Christmas and spend a night of magic and terror on the streets of inner-city Dublin.

Director:
Lance Daly
Writer:
Lance Daly
Stars:
Kelly O'Neill, Shane Curry and Paul Roe



Early in the film we meet Dylan (Shane Curry), approximately 11 years old, sitting on a couch absorbed in a handheld video game and attempting to ignore his father's (Paul Roe) shouts from the kitchen where he is railing at a non-working toaster. We soon learn that rage is his father's natural state; roughly kicked out of the house to "go play", Shane talks to his next door neighbor, Kylie (Kelly O'Neill), of approximately the same age, about what a "prick" his father is, and the wise decision of his brother to run away two years prior, to which Kylie observes that at least Shane's father is not in jail like most fathers in the neighborhood, implying that her father is incarcerated. She tells him about the "Sack Man", who she's heard kills kids, but Shane says that it is just a story, like "Santa and God", used by adults to control kids.
Kylie is sent to "walk" her infant sibling in a stroller. When she returns she sees a motorcycle parked in the driveway of her house and her reaction, her hesitation to go into her house, tells us whoever has arrived makes her apprehensive. Inside she is cajoled by her mother to give her uncle a kiss. Her revulsion is evident. When he is leaving and comes to Kylie's bedroom to say goodbye, Kylie hides under her bed. We see there that she has a stash of cash hidden away in a shoe.
The view returns to Dylan's house, where his father is screaming at Dylan's mother. When he punches her in the face, Dylan gets involved, slamming his handheld videogame into his father face which leaves a shard of plastic embedded in his father's forehead. Dylan is chased by his father into an upstairs bathroom. With the door being busted in, Kylie comes to the rescue, maneuvering a ladder near the window from Dylan's yard which allows him to just escape his father's clutches. The pair run from the scene. They are next seen by a narrow river, where a dredger is passing; they climb aboard over the protests of the captain (David Bendito), a friendly sort, who gives them a ride to the end of the line, near Dublin and tells them about Bob Dylan—Dylan's namesake.
Kylie and Shane seize on the idea that they will attempt to find Dylan's brother, but all they know of his last whereabouts is that he was living in a squat on Gardiner Street. Reaching there, they start knocking on random doors and asking passersby if they know him. Ultimately following a lead to a Gardiner Street flat, a woman there informs them that he was kicked out for fighting six months earlier. Convinced they will not find his brother, Dylan argues that they have little choice but to go home; Kylie vehemently opposes this and runs off.
The two are reunited later when Dylan observes Kylie run into an alley, pursued by a worker of the place from which she stole food. He joins her in hiding, and they narrowly avoid detection. She adamantly says that she never wants to go home. Kylie reveals that her uncle sexually assaulted her, forcing her to go along with it and gaining her terrified silence by telling her that no one would believe her. Together they find some boxes to sleep on, but a man drives by and tries to convince Kylie to ride with him. She refuses, and the car drives away, only for the man to return and kidnap her.
Dylan gives chase, grabbing hold of the bumper of the car. His Heelys, bought earlier from Kylie's savings, allow him to roll along behind the car despite its speed. He screams for help, and the car soon turns into another alley. As the men in the car try to get rid of him, Kylie breaks free of the car, and they both manage to lose their assailants. Realizing that they have feelings for each other, Kylie and Dylan share a passionate kiss. Laughing, they find boxes to sleep on and spend the night on the street.
In the morning, Kylie awakens to find a cold hand beside her, sticking out of the box pile. She reacts with horror, stumbling away and waking Dylan. The remove some boxes to reveal a man, recently dead. The next scene is the two of them in a police car, being returned to their houses. The glamour of living on the streets was obviously lost for them. Their families are waiting outside, concerned. Kylie and Dylan share a moment, staring at each other, and Kylie blows him a kiss before their parents bemusedly yank them away. (from:wikipedia)

cinema e psiche

8 marzo 2012

Get Low (the movie, trailer and review)

Get Low (2009)
100 min  -  Drama | Mystery  -  October 2010 (Poland)



A movie spun out of equal parts folk tale, fable and real-life legend about the mysterious, 1930s Tennessee hermit who famously threw his own rollicking funeral party... while he was still alive.

Director:
Aaron Schneider
Writers:
Chris Provenzano (screenplay), C. Gaby Mitchell (screenplay), and 2 more credits »
Stars:
Robert Duvall, Bill Murray and Sissy Spacek



No one really understands Felix Bush (Robert Duvall), who lives as a hermit deep in the woods. Rumors surround him, like how he might have killed in cold blood, and that he's in league with the devil. So the town is surprised when Felix shows up in town, demanding a "funeral party" for himself. Frank Quinn (Bill Murray), the owner of the local funeral parlor, sees an opportunity for some money, and agrees to let the townsfolk tell Felix Bush the stories they've heard about him. Also a lottery is organized, where people can win Bush's property. Many people buy a ticket. However, nobody wants to tell a story because people fear revenge from Bush.

Things get more complicated when an old mystery is remembered, involving a local widow named Mattie Darrow (Sissy Spacek), who was Bush's girlfriend in their youth, and her deceased sister, Mary Lee. With the help of a preacher who insists that Bush "tell her the truth," Bush recounts to those gathered at his funeral party and, particularly Mattie, about an incident 40 years ago. He reveals he had a relationship with Mattie's married sister, Mary Lee. He confessed to Mattie that it was Mary Lee who was his true love, his only love. They made plans to run away together, and when she didn't arrive at the agreed place, he went to her home to search for her. He discovered that her husband had attacked her with a hammer, knocking her out. The husband threw a kerosene lamp against a wall to set the house on fire and kill himself, the unconscious Mary Lee, and Bush. Bush freed himself from the attacking husband, but as his clothes caught fire, he also saw Mary Lee catch fire. As he went to put the fire out, he felt himself flying through the window, possibly pushed by the husband, and he was unable to re-enter the house to save Mary Lee.

Suffering from survivor's guilt and refusing to ask for forgiveness from God because he didn't feel God was the victim, Bush secreted himself away in the woods in order to "jail himself" for what he perceived as his role in Mary Lee's death: his affair with Mary Lee prompted the husband to murder her the night she was to escape and meet Bush. His self-imposed exile was designed to deny himself a wife, children, and a family.

Relieved at having told his tale, he knew he could "get low" (die) in peace. Mattie forgives him, and they bond over their shared loss. Bush dies shortly after his funeral party and smiles gently at the ghostly image of Mary Lee waiting for him down the lane.

"Get Low" is, in part, considered a psychological drama, it's also one of those films that can be classified as almost anything because the actors are able to add so many layers of interest with intrigue and comedy.

Starring an almost unrecognizably old Robert Duvall and a Jarmusch-styled Bill Murray, respectively, as a hermit wanting to host his own funeral and a funeral home director wanting his business. On the surface, it's a very slow drama because that is essentially all that happens, Murray helps Duvall plan his own funeral. But we are saved from a tedious drama by the actors' comedic timings. There's a lot of dry humour that I found myself laughing out-loud many times. The significance of the film is the psychology in its heart. Throughout, Duvall drops hints as to what his character is all about. You find yourself thinking about who he really is, and what he really means with every line he says. Robert Duvall just may be the best subtle actor.

"Get Low" is very stylized. Set in the 1920s, the director and cinematographer paid attention to the lighting, casting shadows where they wanted them, providing a dark atmosphere when needed to echo the times of the depression-era. I'll also call the humour stylized, it's dry, and it can take you a minute to make sure you got it right.

The one down-side is that the film-makers may have made it a bit too artsy and not accessible enough, because otherwise this could be up for every major award. At least we can rest assured that the Academy knows where to find Mr. Duvall.

psiche e cinema

Get Low (the movie, trailer and review)

Get Low (2009)
100 min  -  Drama | Mystery  -  October 2010 (Poland)



A movie spun out of equal parts folk tale, fable and real-life legend about the mysterious, 1930s Tennessee hermit who famously threw his own rollicking funeral party... while he was still alive.

Director:
Aaron Schneider
Writers:
Chris Provenzano (screenplay), C. Gaby Mitchell (screenplay), and 2 more credits »
Stars:
Robert Duvall, Bill Murray and Sissy Spacek



No one really understands Felix Bush (Robert Duvall), who lives as a hermit deep in the woods. Rumors surround him, like how he might have killed in cold blood, and that he's in league with the devil. So the town is surprised when Felix shows up in town, demanding a "funeral party" for himself. Frank Quinn (Bill Murray), the owner of the local funeral parlor, sees an opportunity for some money, and agrees to let the townsfolk tell Felix Bush the stories they've heard about him. Also a lottery is organized, where people can win Bush's property. Many people buy a ticket. However, nobody wants to tell a story because people fear revenge from Bush.

Things get more complicated when an old mystery is remembered, involving a local widow named Mattie Darrow (Sissy Spacek), who was Bush's girlfriend in their youth, and her deceased sister, Mary Lee. With the help of a preacher who insists that Bush "tell her the truth," Bush recounts to those gathered at his funeral party and, particularly Mattie, about an incident 40 years ago. He reveals he had a relationship with Mattie's married sister, Mary Lee. He confessed to Mattie that it was Mary Lee who was his true love, his only love. They made plans to run away together, and when she didn't arrive at the agreed place, he went to her home to search for her. He discovered that her husband had attacked her with a hammer, knocking her out. The husband threw a kerosene lamp against a wall to set the house on fire and kill himself, the unconscious Mary Lee, and Bush. Bush freed himself from the attacking husband, but as his clothes caught fire, he also saw Mary Lee catch fire. As he went to put the fire out, he felt himself flying through the window, possibly pushed by the husband, and he was unable to re-enter the house to save Mary Lee.

Suffering from survivor's guilt and refusing to ask for forgiveness from God because he didn't feel God was the victim, Bush secreted himself away in the woods in order to "jail himself" for what he perceived as his role in Mary Lee's death: his affair with Mary Lee prompted the husband to murder her the night she was to escape and meet Bush. His self-imposed exile was designed to deny himself a wife, children, and a family.

Relieved at having told his tale, he knew he could "get low" (die) in peace. Mattie forgives him, and they bond over their shared loss. Bush dies shortly after his funeral party and smiles gently at the ghostly image of Mary Lee waiting for him down the lane.

"Get Low" is, in part, considered a psychological drama, it's also one of those films that can be classified as almost anything because the actors are able to add so many layers of interest with intrigue and comedy.

Starring an almost unrecognizably old Robert Duvall and a Jarmusch-styled Bill Murray, respectively, as a hermit wanting to host his own funeral and a funeral home director wanting his business. On the surface, it's a very slow drama because that is essentially all that happens, Murray helps Duvall plan his own funeral. But we are saved from a tedious drama by the actors' comedic timings. There's a lot of dry humour that I found myself laughing out-loud many times. The significance of the film is the psychology in its heart. Throughout, Duvall drops hints as to what his character is all about. You find yourself thinking about who he really is, and what he really means with every line he says. Robert Duvall just may be the best subtle actor.

"Get Low" is very stylized. Set in the 1920s, the director and cinematographer paid attention to the lighting, casting shadows where they wanted them, providing a dark atmosphere when needed to echo the times of the depression-era. I'll also call the humour stylized, it's dry, and it can take you a minute to make sure you got it right.

The one down-side is that the film-makers may have made it a bit too artsy and not accessible enough, because otherwise this could be up for every major award. At least we can rest assured that the Academy knows where to find Mr. Duvall.

psiche e cinema

6 marzo 2012

Brain week

Dal 12 al 18 marzo si celebra la Settimana mondiale del cervello con conferenze, mostre e dibattiti aperti al pubblico.

Per avere maggiori informazioni su tutte le iniziative in programma, visitare i siti www.neuro.it e www.dana.org/brainweek/calendar/.

L'Unione Europea concretizza il suo interesse per gli studi sul cervello avallando un ambizioso programma di ricerca sull'efficienza mentale finanziato per i prossimi sette anni.

Riassumendo i risultati della ricerca internazionale si può dire che sono sei le mosse vincenti per proteggere la mente e diminuire il rischio di cadere nella demenza senile, eccole in ordine d'importanza: movimento, dieta, esercizi mentali, qualità del sonno, intensità dei rapporti sociali e livello di stress cronico.

«Ormai è chiaro - spiega Stefano Cappa, docente di Neuroscienze al San Raffaele di Milano - che dalla farmacologia non arriverà una "pillola salva-memoria", mentre l'invecchiamento della popolazione moltiplica i casi di demenza che stanno portando al collasso i sistemi sanitari. Riuscire a prolungare anche di soli due anni una condizione di buona efficienza mentale porterebbe vantaggi sociali ed economici vitali».

L'attività fisica, anche moderata, ha un effetto protettivo direttamente sul cervello, bastano trenta minuti al giorno cinque volte a settimana. La dieta mediterranea migliora in modo diretto, non conseguente, il metabolismo e la circolazione sanguigna. L'ideale è mangiare pochi prodotti animali, zuccheri raffinati e cibi industriali. Cruciverba, sudoku e simili aiutano a rimanere lucidi, così come l'alta scolarità e i lavori intellettualmente impegnativi. Tuttavia i benefici sembrano meno duraturi rispetto all'attività fisica e all'alimentazione. «L'alta scolarità e le attività lavorative intellettuali - approfondisce Cappa - più che proteggere dalla demenza, sembrano rinviare la data di comparsa. Probabilmente una vita intellettualmente stimolante fornisce al cervello una riserva cognitiva che gli consente di resistere più a lungo alla perdita di cellule nervose».

fonte: eDott